Saturday, October 21, 2017

Background Neutron Radiation for NearSys Station, 21 October 2017

Over 144.02 hours of observation, three thermal neutrons were detected. That's a background level of 1.04 microrem per hour over the monitoring time.


Sky and Ground Thermal Observation for NearSys Station, 21 October 2017

At 11:00 AM MDT, the sky above NearSys Station was 100% covered with low stratus, it has not started to rain yet. The thermal imager measured the ground temperature as 27 *F and the sky temperature at 9 * F.

Assuming a dry adiobatic lapse rate of 5.4 *F, the ceiling altitude was 3,300 feet.

The Boise METAR reported broken clouds at 9,500 feet AGL. At 4:00 PM, the Boise METAR reported 100% overcast at an altitude of 3,600 feet.

If I can assume station BOI have the same type of cloud cover as NearSys Station in the afternoon, then the altitude calculation NearSys Station was reasonable.


Tuesday, October 17, 2017

All Sky Photometer for NearSys Station, 17 October 2017

In an attempt to find out why the all sky photometer can show spikes before and after local noon, I tried another experiment today. This time the photometer was tilted and oriented to place it's DB9 connector towards the south.

The results look much better, inspite of the intermittent cloud cover this afternoon. In addition, the sky has grown hazy again.

I will need to create a consistent angle of tilt before making this a standard procedure.


Monday, October 16, 2017

All Sky Photometer for NearSys Station, 16 October 2017

In an effort to determine what may be causing the unusual spikes in my Photometer results, I've run the Photometer almost evryday in a different orientation. Today, the Photometer was oriented with the DB9 connector pointing south.

This time the data shows two spikes, one before local noon and the other after local noon. But unlike prior data, the spikes are for different colors - blue in the morning and red in the afternoon.

Obviously, I have more tests to run. Perhaps I'll tilt the Photometer next.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

All Sky Photometer Data for NearSys Station, 15 October 2017

Photometer data was collected starting at 6:00 AM MDT. The sky was clear, but it was also a frosty morning. The photometer has been left out all night.

The blue spike is unique, it has never been observed before. It was also determined the photometer battery has a low voltage. Either frost or low voltage may have contributed to the blue spike. Another test will be necessary to investigate this matter.

The photometer was oriented with its DB9 connector facing North.


Sky and Ground Thermal Observation for NearSys Station, 15 Octiber 2017

Ground and Sky ovservations were made at 4:30 PM MDT. The ground temperature was 28 *F and the cloud temperature was -25*F. Assuming a dry adiobatic lapse rate of 5.4 *F per 1,000 feet, the cirrus clouds above NearSys Station had a base of 9,800 feet.

The Boise METAR reports clear skies up to 12,000 feet.

In this case, cirrus clouds are 2,000 higher than indicated.

A RGB image of cirrus clouds above NearSys Station.

The Seek Reveal thermal image.

Background Neutron Radiation for NearSys Station, 15 October 2017

After 177 hours of monitoring, nine neutrons were detected. That's an exposure rate of 2.5 microrem per hour of thermal neutron radiation.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Visibility for NearSys Station, 13 October 2017

Based on images collected at an altitude of 400 feet, the visibility is 40 miles.
Looking East. Clouds obscure the Boises.

Looking North

Looking South, some light snow is visible on the highest peaks of the Owyhees.

Looking West

UAVSonde Data for NearSys Station, 13 October 2017

UAVSonde data collected at 5:35 PM MDT. Here are the data.

Altitude: 2,250 feet
Temperature: 57 *F
Relative Humidity: 100%
Pressure: 942.9 mb

Altitude: 2,591 feet
Temperature: 50 *F
Relative Humidity: 100%
Pressure: 928.0 mb

Sky and Ground Thermal Observation for NearSys Station, 13 October 2017

Ground and sky observations were made at 6:20 AM MDT using a Week Reveal thermal imager.

The ground had a temperature of 22 *F. The sky has broken stratonimbus and NearSys Station is experiencing light, intermittent rain. The cloud temperature is 7* F.

Assuming a wet adiobatic lapse rate (since it's raining) of 2.7 *F per 1,000 feet (the actual value depends on the temperature), the height to the cloud base is 5,500 feet. The Boise METAR reports broken clouds at 6,000 feet.


All Sky Photometer Data for NearSys Station, 12 October 2017

Photometer data was collected beginning at 6:00 AM MDT. This time the DB-9 connector of the photometer was oriented towards the east. The red channel shows a switch from being the lowest value to the highest as the sun approached due south.

After it stops raining, I will try orienting the photometer towards the south and the north.


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

All Sky Photometer Data for NearSys Station, 10 October 2017

Photometer data were collected beginning at 6:00 AM MDT. The morning orange spike is back. The DB-9 connector was facing west. I'll change its direction next time and see how that effects the spike. A change was made in data collection. Now all data is recorded at 10-bit resolution and recorded as one word variables (rather than as one byte variables). Recording as larger variables makes it easier and faster to format the data.
The presence of afternoon clouds is responsible for the spikiness seen in the data after 1:00 PM. 

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Visibility Report for NearSys Station, 8 October 2017

Based on UAVSonde images taken at 400 feet AGL, the visibility at NearSys Station is over 50 miles.

Looking East

Looking North


Looking West

Looking South

UAVSonde Data for NearSys Station, 8 October 2017

UAVSonde data was collected at 8:30 AM. Here are the data.

Altitude: 2,453 feet
Temperature: 54 *F
Relative Humidity: NA
Pressure: 917.6 mb

Altitude: 2,696 feet
Temperature: 50 *F
Relative Humidity: NA
Pressure: 916.9 mb

The GPS reciever tilted during the flight and some altitude reports were lost.

Sky and Ground Thermal Observation for NearSys Station, 8 October 2017

At 8:30 AM, skies over NearSys Station were mostly cloudy. The ground temperature was 23 *F and the cloud temperature was 9 *F. Assuming a dry adiobatic lapse rate of 5.4 *F per 1,000 feet, the cloud base was 2,600 feet AGL.

The Boise METAR reported broken clouds at 5,000 feet AGL.

Thermal infrared image taken of the cumulus above NearSys Station

Color image of the broken cumulus above NearSys Station

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Sky and Ground Thermal Observation for NearSys Station, 1 October 2017

I don't normally make two observations this close in tine, but felt I had too great an opportunity to pass up.

The skies above NearSys Station are broken cumulus. A check of the METAR from BOI (the Boise Airport) indicates cumulus clouds with altitudes between 4,000 and 6,000 feet.

The ground temperature at NearSys Station is 44 *F. The temperature of the cumulus clouds is 13 *F. Assuming a dry adiobatic lapse rate of 5.4 *F indicates a cloud height of 5,700 feet.

I need to see if every measure is within this level of accuracy.